WHITE CRONE interview. ‘The Poisoner’ album & ‘Stargazer’ single out now.

I spoke to Lisa Mann about her WHITE CRONE project. It’s a fantastic album, full of 70s style vibes, a real awesome trip back in time. We chatted about pretty much everything, from early influences, her first bass, to working as a blues musician still harbouring those old school Metal roots, giving VENOM the DIO treatment, and writing epic songs, including one about a Mayan king whose name we both struggled with. We had such a massive chat and it was so much fun, I just left the whole thing in it’s original form. 

2 film clips are featured below, the album title track, ‘The Poisoner’, and the latest one, an incredible version of the RAINBOW classic, ‘Stargazer’ with Vinny Appice on drums. Enjoy.

MAL-
Joining me on her Friday night and my Saturday morning is Lisa Mann. Lisa, thanks for taking the time and joining me today.
LISA-
Hey, thank you very much. Thank you.
MAL-
It's good to talk to you. We will be leading up to the magnificent WHITE CRONE album, but first, give us a little bit of background on yourself, and what you've been doing and what led up to this.
LISA-
Oh gosh, that's a long story. Well, you know, I was a young budding bass player. When I was a kid I just was attracted to the sound of the bass and my parents had albums from bands like CREAM and LED ZEPPELIN and, you know, BLACK SABBATH. And I just love that sound and I would plunk out bass lines on my mom's acoustic guitar, until one day, I saw a violin shape bass look like the BEATLE bass, but it was like a Japanese copy of that bass and I saw it at a pawn shop and it was like, that's it. And I put 10 bucks down on the thing. And I walked home from school, saved my lunch money to buy that bass. So, I became a bass player, at a very young age. I played in some punk, crossover metal bands, started with a band called DEAD CONSPIRACY, played some gigs. I went to a lot of shows, was really into Heavy Metal and IRON MAIDEN man that just played all these Steve Heretics licks, you know, (Pretty hard to be a bass player and not be influenced by Steve Harris). Oh, yeah, absolutely, you know, so yeah, then I decided I want to work as a bass player, became a top 40 rock player at the age of 19 and eventually, you know, just playing gigs and eventually I moved back to Portland from Seattle, I lived in Seattle during the 90s, and start getting into blues. And I really fell in love with blues music and I realized that all those early licks that I was playing on the bass from you know, LED ZEPPELIN and DEEP PURPLE and stuff is like that's blues, man. It was like a real revelation, you know, so yeah, I'm a professional Blues musician. That's what I do for a living, but I never lost my love of Heavy Metal. And so I created WHITE CHRONE as kind of an alter ego,  my evil twin.
MAL-
So have you been gigging with WHITE CRONE or is that a studio thing?
LISA-
No, it's just a studio project, really. And actually, I wasn't even sure I was going to release it. I thought it was just going to be something for me for my own edification and it's just mostly me and a drummer. So Larry London plays the majority of the drums. I play the majority of the guitars. I play all the bass, I do all the singing and so, you know, it's not really a band to be had. Mehdi Farjami from GLACIER laid down a few really good solos that were like way above my pay grade, you know, and there's Vinny Appice guested, had a guest percussionist, Caton Lyles and recorded it at Opal Studios in Portland. And yeah, it's really just a recording project. It's not to say if if there's enough demand someday you know, maybe I'll put a band together, but it'd be a big, a big undertaking and I'd have to teach everybody my guitar parts.
MAL-
How long did it take to get all this together? Were you writing it as you go, or do you have all this stuff like demoed, if you like, and then just sort of go in and do it properly? How long did the whole process take?
LISA-
Yeah. I did full pre-production at home in my spare time because like I said, you know, I'm full-time working Blues musician, and yeah, I'm dealing with radio promotions and gigs and tours and stuff like that. I just did this in my spare time really, so it took a few years. Actually,when I started it, I would just hear stuff in my head. It actually started when I first heard 'Cerice' by GHOST, and I was just like, 'wow, that's weird, that's crazy'. And people are like, 'that's not real metal. It sounds like disco and I'm like, 'yeah, but that guy doesn't care what you think. He's just being creative and he's a great songwriter'. And so it inspired me to just say, you know, why should I worry what these Blues people think? You know, I do what you want and then all the sudden I started hearing these basslines and melodies and guitar parts, and was singing them onto my phone. I'd have to jump out of the shower and like sing stuff into my phone and pull over the car. So I started doing pre-production at home and I recorded everything at home, including the drums badly. I wrote all the drums, really terribly on an E-kit. And I bought a seven string guitar and eventually decided let's get it in the studio with a real drummer.
MAL-
When you hear music that influences you, do you hear..., does the bass drill into your head? Do you hear that from a bass player's point of view? Does that get in your head from a bass to hear that sort of backing? I don't know how to even ask the question properly.
LISA-
I think it depends on the band. You know, it's like JUDAS PRIEST is really a big influence, but a lot of Ian Hill's basslines are like ding, ding, ding, ding, ding, ding ding, you know, it's more like Rob Halford lines. I have a picture of Glenn Tipton on my wall. It says 'what would Glenn Tipton do?' So it's like so for when I'm listening to JUDAS PRIEST, it's the guitar lines, that are speaking to me when I'm listening to DIO it's the vocals, you know, when I'm listening to IRON MAIDEN, of course, it's the bass.
MAL-
Now we'll get onto the WHITE CRONE album, which is  ....... excellent.
LISA-
Thank you very much.
MAL-
It's, it's a real trip. I mean, I put that on and I'm like, wow, I mean, I started getting into like Heavy Rock, and Metal in probably 79-80 because I wasn't exposed to it. I didn't have parents with LED ZEPPELIN albums, nothing like that, let me tell you, so I wasn't exposed to so when it came on into my life, you know 79-80 (but) I've obviously gotten into the music from back from the 70s. But listen to listening to the WHITE CRONE album. It's a real trip back as if you were alive and into it back, then in the 70s. Ummm, how did you do that?
LISA-
The thing is, I call myself the Unfrozen Cavewoman of Metal because there's this whole like, 90s and 2000's era of metal that I am pretty damn clueless about. I mean, I know a few PANTERA songs, you know, but all of my references are from what I listen to as a teenager in the 80s, and I listen to late 70s, you know PRIEST especially ,love JUDAS PRIEST, DEEP PURPLE, that kind of stuff, you know, early IRON MAIDEN, that real raw punkish kind of IRON MAIDEN and also I was into that first wave of Black Metal stuff. Yep, CELTIC FROST MERCYFUL FATE. MERCYFUL FATE was a big influence, you know, it's odd because a lot of people compare my stuff to Uriah Heep.
MAL-
I did hear a lot of that in there, yeah.
LISA-
Yeah. I actually didn't listen to a lot of URIAH HEEP, but I listened to bands that were inspired by URIAH HEEP. So I think it kind of came in like in a recycled way. It's always been pretty interesting when people say that.
MAL-
Yeah. Yeah. I hear a lot of the vibe from, you know, RAINBOW, obviously, HEEP, SABBATH, you know, all those sorts of bands. But in that era mainly for me, I hear the, if you like, the early 70s. Yeah, but it's interesting you mention JUDAS PRIEST in there because that's still the best era of PRIEST in my eyes.
LISA-
Me too. 'Sad wings'. I could listen to 'Sad Wings' all day long.
MAL-
'Stained Class' for me.
LISA-
'Stained Class', oh, yeah. Oh, yeah, it's tough. Its classy.
MAL-
Yeah. Absolutely. Where did Vinny come into this? That's an interesting one. A friend of a friend?
LISA-
Ah, no, you'll think this is funny. I recorded a song for my Blues album 'Hard Times, Bad Decisions'. I released that in 2016.
MAL-
That sounds like a country song title.
LISA-
'Hard Times, Bad Decisions'. Yeah, so I wrote this song about how people who are coming out of the prison system are treated like pariahs and they're just not, especially in this country. They're not given a chance, you know, they've paid their price and so I had this real slow beat, it's like working on a chain gang, you know, like these guys on the Railroad and so it's like 60 beats per minute. And I kept hearing in my, see Vinny was my favorite drummer, except for maybe Dave Lombardo, Vinny Appice, he's like hands down my favorite drummer and I kept hearing him playing on this. I got Ben Rice to play slide guitar. But anyway, I thought to myself. 'Well, what if I asked Dave , who's a session drummer, I work with, I could ask him to try to play like Vinny and I just kept going, 'But I want Vinny', so I thought to myself, ' Well, ask him' and I'd say to myself 'Samba, you can't it just ask him'. 'Yeah, you can', so I cold called him, man. I just Googled Vinny and I tried to find like an email address. (Shoot your shot) Found an email address. I shot him an email. I sent him a song that sounds similar, song called This Bitch' that has a similar feel and I said, I'm doing a song, it's about this, going to have slide guitar. Would you be interested? And he said, yes, and he did and he tracked it at home. He sent me the tracks. They were mixed over at Opal Studio. It's who I work with. Same guy I worked with for 'The Poisoner'. Same guy does my Blues records. He's an old-school metal head too, you know, you'd be surprised there's a lot of Blues people that are into metal to. Yeah. So yeah, that's a long story short. I cold called him.
MAL-
You miss 100% of the shots you don't take.
LISA-
Well, yeah, exactly. And what's the worst thing that could happen? He just didn't respond or just said, no. Yes, anything could've happened, so why not?
MAL-
Shoot your shot, exactly right,
LISA-
Yeah. I asked Alex Skolnick, he said no, so whatever. Sometime later Alex.
MAL-
All right. So let's go through some of the stuff on this album. What have we got as far as.....Before we go any further, how the hell did 'The Seven Gates Of Hell' end up on there?
LISA-
You know what? I was on a transatlantic flight and I knew it was going to be a long-ass flight. I had done some tours of the UK with a blues band. Dudley Ross is guitar player puts together a band for me over there. But yeah, I knew I was going to be on this long flight. So I loaded up my phone with a bunch of albums, and there was a VENOM album that I downloaded. I use Napster. I like Napster. I like the format. I like the fact they pay musicians a little better per stream. But anyway, I had it on and they get it's like all these songs like a compilation album, is that I'm just chilling. Taking a nap, whatever eat my lunch and listening and then the song comes on and I hadn't heard in ages. And it just hit me how structurally sound that song is, but how brutally performed it was, how just like a raw slab of meat, you know?
MAL-
Yeah, they were that sort of band.
LISA-
And he's just screaming these vocals and I thought just structurally, this song is like a DIO song or something MANOWAR tune, you know, and I decided I'm going to do this, so while I'm on the plane I started writing the melody. The singing. Okay. What if Dio sang this song? I started writing the melody and by the time I got off the plane, I was like, okay. I know what I'm going to do.
MAL-
Yeah, I've got all those early VENOM albums even early VENOM singles, just back in there. And actually, just on a side note, I managed to see Venom in 1986 in the States, and it was pretty, pretty wild, let me tell you, but but the thing is, when I listened to that album and and that came on and I'm like 'are you shitting me?' It shouldn't fit, but it does.
LISA-
Okay, good. I set out to do that to you and it worked.
MAL-
Excellent. What else have we got on here? Any sort of stories behind any of the other songs on there?
LISA-
Well, I'll tell you I'll start with 'The Dream Of Tiamat', the first song. That's actually based on a real nightmare I had when I was a teenager and I was in this cave in the centre of the earth and I saw this serpent, this gigantic serpent with the face of a woman and I felt drawn to her and as I approached and she opened her mouth and I stuck my head into her mouth and she bit off my head and then all of a sudden I was looking out of her eyes. And I was waiting for the next victim to come along and it was such a profound dream, I never forgot it. And I always wanted to write a song about that dream and that's the story and I gave that really a MERCYFUL FATE flavour, just because that sense of fear, that was fear and longing in that song. So that's the story of that one.
MAL-
Hmm. What about 'Broken'?
LISA-
Oh, 'Broken', 'Broken' is one of the few non-mystical songs because the majority of WHITE CRONE songs, they are and will be in the future are going to be like more like storytelling mystical story telling, but that's based on reality. And it's based, it's about how how women have basically participated in their own subjugation throughout history by visiting these awful practices on their daughters. And that's something that always struck me. It's like in China it was the mother that broke the daughter's foot and bound it, you know, really? And in North Africa. It's like it's the mother that does the circumcision on the female, the four-year-old, girl, you know, and then the Bible Belt that you know, it's the mother that says, you know, 'no, no, don't speak. You know, when you get married. You'll learn you don't speak up', you know, so yeah, that always struck me. Always wanted to write a song about why that just.. itjust perplexes me. It's from the from the point of view of the mother, a wicked song.
MAL-
'Under Hag Stones'. That's an epic. One of my favorites on the album. Tell us about that one.
LISA-
I had this idea of an ancient Celtic zombie curse of these beings that died horribly and they did not want to rest in their graves and the only way to keep them down was to put these holy Stones, you know, the stones that have holes drilled, these Hag Stones and to cover the grave with these stones, river Rocks, you know, but over time, people move in, you know, from Europe. And they said, this is just superstition. This is silly, and then over time people start ...industrial era, they build buildings and homes and pretty soon. It's like, oh well, let's put an apartment complex over here and let's get rid of these old graves. I just love stories like that one. I love shlocky horror stories like that.
MAL-
The couple of instrumentals, one a longer one and one a shorter one. Is that pretty much all you?
LISA-
Yes. Actually 'Melancholia' that is, that's me playing one bass. So I play, ... I play that and I played chords up higher and then D do dee do dee do dee on my 6 string bass. So it's all one bass and then I had Larry London play drums behind it. There were kind of like marching. I can hear it. It's almost like a distant Battlefield. That's the image I get is hearing these drums, distant Battlefield. The battle is over and this melancholy feeling, I guess we've won the battle, but our comrades are dead. That's the feeling that I had.
MAL-
There's a real vibe on that one especially, but I just can't pin it down. It gets stuck in your head and you think, oh man, this is taking me back, man, but I just can't figure out where it's taking me back to. Let's talk about the other one. You did a cover of 'Stargazer'. So you took , you said I'll take RAINBOW's version and I'll raise you. Tell us about that one. The idea behind that one and how it came together and you've put a bit more on it. Put a bit more cream on the RAINBOW version.
LISA-
Yeah, we actually borrowed some of DREAM THEATER. I think it was their version to get just more keyboards in there and it's a brighter sound, because the original, it's a pretty mushy mix. You know, there's a, there's an orchestra in there and we didn't have an orchestra and we have slide guitar just all over the place. The origin of that is really there's a blues rock guitar players, really well-known in the PORTLAND scene named Alastair Greene and he used to play guitar with Sugar Ray Rayford, and he's a Grammy nominated soul artist. My husband plays bass with Sugar Ray. So, I went to Europe and hung out with them when they were on tour and did some backups with him and stuff. And so, I got to know, Alastair, and Alastair, like I said, man, you wouldn't believe how many of these blues musicians are old school metal heads, right? So this dude, he loves all that stuff. He loves, you know, Ritchie Blackmore, nd, you know, all that IRON MAIDEN, all that stuff, you know, VAN HALEN. So he and I decided we got to do something together, and this is a couple years ago, and we got to do something together and say, all right, I'll come up with something. And I was driving in my car one day last year and I heard 'Stargazer', come on the radio, and I was just like almost weeping. I hadn't heard it in a long time. And it was just like, 'wow, I want to sing this song'. And then I thought 'this is the one I want to do with Alastair'. And then once I decided I was going to do that. I called him and then I was like, 'well who's gonna play drums on it? I mean, who might know this song already? you know, so I emailed Vinny, and then the guy who played keyboards. I was in a band with him when I was like 17 years old. So, I really wanted to work with somebody, the way I did with Mehdi Farjami. I was jammed with him when I was like 15 and 16 years old. So I wanted somebody who's from the, from my heart, was part of my life that time. So it was like, okay we're doing it. It was mostly remote tracking. I was really, I'm pretty pleased with it. It's really long.
MAL-
We've talked about your bass influences. Let's talk about singing. When did you start?
LISA-
Well, I started singing along with my mom's records. My dad was more into the LED ZEPPELIN and CREAM, you know, stuff like that. But my mom was into Barbra Streisand and Melissa Manchester and Yma Sumac, she was into singers. She loved DIO too, you know when I was a teenager, she took me to a DIO concert when I was a teenager, and she just loved singers. And she encouraged me to sing. I would go to karaoke with her and sing WHITNEY HOUSTON and stuff like that. She hated it when I sang along with my MERCYFUL FATE records. She hated that, but she loved it when I sang along with IRON MAIDEN records and with JUDAS PRIEST, DIO, and MANOWAR and stuff like that. She loved that. So Eric Adams was a huge influence, you know, Rob Halford, Bruce Dickinson and Dio. I'd say Bruce Dickinson and Dio are my two biggest influences. Yeah, I'd say some Ann Wilson, some Geddy Lee in there, you know, but mostly Bruce is probably my biggest.
MAL-
Yes, the vocals on this album, they really match it more than I think anyone can possibly fathom if you like. They're so, you've got the ideal voice for this. I mean, I know you're writing it yourself, but it just fits so well and that's another one of these trips back in time.
LISA-
Thank you. There was an audition I had a long time ago where the band was split about whether they would hire me to sing in their project because my voice is low and it was a symphonic metal project. Later on the two kind of split apart. I ended up singing It's a project called CRY FOR EDEN. But I remember it was kind of controversial because it was like, well they want someone like Nightwish. There's this idea of the female singer, she's supposed to have this head voice, isn't? (It can really be overdone) Yeah, it's marketable. And then people say, I want to be part of that market, but that's not me.
MAL-
I'm into symphonic metal as well. But sometimes the operatic vocals can be overdone and I heard a symphonic metal band recently and the thing that struck me was they didn't sound like they were trying to be NIGHTWISH, or trying to sound like they're coming from Finland.
LISA-
Yeah, we just sound like what we sound like and so, you know, I really appreciate that you appreciate my voice because you know, like I said most of my metal vocal influences are men. So I have somewhat of a masculine sounding voice in some ways just because those are my influences. Hmm, you know, some people like it, some people don't.
MAL-
And that's good, variety.
LISA-
It's the spice of life.
MAL-
Hey, yeah. What else should we chat about? We've gone all over this album.
LISA-
I would love to talk about '18 rabbit'.
MAL-
Yes. Yeah that that's the last track on the album for people new to the conversation.
LISA-
That's kind of the crux. It's kind of the center of the WHITE CRONE project really. And years ago. I saw a documentary about the Mayan King, whose name. I cannot even pronounce. They called him '18 rabbit'. That's what they named him. You know, the archaeologist named him and he was a patron of the Arts. Architects, you know, came in from all over to his kingdom, by some accountsit was a peaceful Kingdom. He wasn't warring with anybody and they built these incredible stone monuments and he left this massive legacy of this city of, just incredible stone... Well, you know, most of them had his face on it, but he was a Mayan King, that's what they did back then. But his story. He also came to this grisly end because these warring tribes were jealous of his kingdom. And so that's part of the story of the song. And then at the end, I have his tapping verse about leaving a legacy of art for the future. And so that whole song just kind of wraps up its got this big lot of IRON MAIDEN bass influences and stuff. And so just that song is just really special to me because I feel like it's a story that that people should know. And he was this person in history that I think people should know about.
MAL-
Yes. You may have heard me typing. I was just Googling that. Yeah, I can see why you're not going to try and pronounce it. Uaxaclajuun Ubʼaah Kawiil. Yeah, something like that, but I'll probably got away wrong because they pronounce our letters differently over there, which is fine. Yes, that looks like an interesting story one, which I shall read after this phone call. So that's another fascinating one, the big epic to finish the album. Yeah, so where can people get this album? I notice you've got a bandcamp setup. Is that the best place for you.
LISA-
That's the best place because you're going to get it directly from me. But if you would like to buy the CD and you are in the EU or elsewhere, and the shipping cost is too high message me, but also there is a low-cost shipping option where I basically just pull the tray out. I pop the tray out. It has a booklet in it, so it has a slot where I can just put the CD and so you would just get it without the plastic tray. So there's a low shipping option because it's really expensive to ship anything from the US but you can also download the album. I have patches. I have a few t-shirts left. And yeah, it's whitecrone.bandcamp.com. That is definitely the best place, I'll autograph it for you, you know, so that's the best place. You can also stream it. I'm also, I always encourage people add it, stream it, add it on your playlist, on Spotify. You know, we don't make a lot of money per stream. But so many people use Spotify, you know, especially with my Blues career. I've made a good chunk of change on Spotify. So it all does help when you like an artist who ever, they are you, whatever platform you use just stream it, add them to your playlist, buy the merch.
MAL-
Old school people like you and I really miss the big chunk of cardboard. (Yeah, and that smell) a special time in life, which the kids today just don't get (liner notes). Yeah. Headphones on album in your hand, reading the lyrics, assuming there was 'Wow, this one's got lyrics'. Yep, so that was good. You couldn't just look them up online. Kids are spoilt these days. (Fold out albums). And the double live with the you know the inserts, good times.
LISA-
You know, I wanted to put 'The Poisoner' on vinyl, but it's too long. I would have to take a song off.
MAL-
Yeah, and if you try and jam the songs that you've got on there, the quality really suffers, back to VENOM one of their albums whatever was I think it was 'Possessed', the VENOM album 'Possessed'. I think it was, it was quite a long album and they tried to cram on, on the the LP, without cutting a track out, and the quality was just a joke. That was the story I remember anyway.
LISA-
Yeah, it's not worth it, you know, because of audio quality is important to me. You know, I think you can download. I know you can download MP3s, but you may be able to download Flac as well. on bandcamp. I'm not sure. I try to get the flac out to people. Yeah.
MAL-
High quality downloading MP3 flac and more. That's directly from the bandcamp. What haven't we covered Lisa? We've had a good old chat, this is great.
LISA-
Yeah. Well, like I said, WHITE CRONE is a recording project but I joined a band, an existing band from Portland called SPLINTERED THRONE and I was a fan of theirs and I had one of their CDs and I saw them open for LAST IN LINE and for FLOTSAM AND JETSAM when they came to town, and they played a gig, and the singer announced that he was leaving. And so, I had a friend with me. She's like, 'go talk to him'. And I was like, 'really?' And so, I did and I did an audition with them, and they asked me to join the band. So we've had a bazillion delays. This was in 2019. And so they have day jobs, and families and stuff. And I've got my blues thing and so that those were some delays and then the pandemic. So it's like we couldn't rehearse and it's just just a mess, but we have songs written and we're getting into the studio soon. And we're going to make a record. It's going to be a killer record, and it's very much like old-school 80s metal. It's got some power metal influences. It's got some early black metal and thrash influences, but it's super melodic. You know, these guys are really into MAIDEN and ANTHRAX and stuff like that. So I think it's going to be great. I'm really looking forward to this and that's a band and I'm, you know, the vocalist so that is a band that will perform live in the future.
MAL-
Not playing bass on that one?
LISA-
I'm not playing bass in that band. They have a bass player. What do I do with my hands?
MAL-
Yeah, that's exactly what I was getting at. How are you going to be on stage without a bass hanging around your neck?
LISA-
Free to just jump around like a lunatic if I want.
MAL-
Okay good. I've seen bass players and then just sing and they're just stuck there like, 'what do I do?' They haven't got that security blanket in front of them. So that's what's happening in that regard. What else? What else have we got to chat about? Holding up your Friday night here.
LISA-
Well, eventually, you know, I've got a few new WHITE CRONE songs that exist in skeletal form. Like I said, my life gets busy. I'm actually surprised at how busy I got as a blues musician during the pandemic because I did a lot of live streams. I actually did the Great British Rhythm And Blues Festival. I performed the festival few years ago, but they asked me to do the virtual Festival. I did a festival. I think it was bassd in Australia as well. I've you know, I've done a lot a lot of these, you know, I did this Can't stop the blues' thing, which is a big series. So I got really busy live streaming and, you know, that was a lot of fun, but I haven't revisited the new WHITE CRONE songs. I'll probably hire more real guitar players because, you know, to be honest, some of the guitar solos on 'The Poisoner' are kind of like 'Baby's First Solo' because I really just taught myself by watching YouTube videos, some of it that I'm writing is a little more complex and I'll probably hire a real guitar player to play some of that stuff. 'Stay in my Lane'. Vinny Appice will make an appearance. I promise you that.
MAL-
Good, get him out of his room. When you're doing the live stream, are you're doing it where you are now? (Yeah.) What's that on the wall behind you?
LISA-
Oh, this is a, this is a screen that I have just bought. It's a, it's a think it's from the 1800s. It's a story about this warrior. I can't remember the story. This Warrior's about to be executed, and this giant skeleton comes in and scares the hell out of this guy. So I can't remember the story. But I saw this online. I just set myself up here and got a screen. And instead of doing the backdrop where it's like your head is Vanishing half the time. Get a real backdrop.
MAL-
I gotta do the same here. Actually took the mirror down and put up a photo of Justin from THE DARKNESS up here so, a little bit more metal.
LISA-
Yeah, right on. Yeah, they old school man. I love THE DARKNESS. They keep it real.
MAL-
That was the last gig, like International gig in my city, before lockdown, THE DARKNESS actually had to leave the country the next day, cut the tour short and left the country the next day. otherwise they wouldn't have been able to get out, and I managed to snag a photo pass for that. So that's looking right up Justin's nostrils. I won't be able to hang it up there now without breaking it, so I'll just leave that down. So you can see I need a screen like yours. I think we pretty much covered it all for now. Yeah, maybe we'll have a talk to you when that album with that band you joined. SPLINTERED THRONE, we'll keep an eye on. Yeah, keep us informed about that one. We've pretty much covered it all, Lisa, I think, don't you? (I think so) It's been great having you on been a really good, nice relaxed chat about everything and thanks for coming on.
LISA-
Hey, thank you. And thank you for listening to my songs. You know, I'm glad you enjoy them. I mean really, you know, I try to make a living at music and it's always great when people buy your stuff or buy tickets to your show, or something like that, but what really feeds us is just knowing that someone's listening to this thing that you put all this time and effort into and you kind of pour your heart into it and just to know that someone's really listening and enjoying it. I mean it just it gets you right here.
MAL-
Lisa, absolutely great chatting with you. Thanks so much for coming on, really good luck with 'The Poisoner', magnificent trip back in time. I love it.
LISA-
Right on. Thank you, very, very much.
MAL-
You are more than welcome. Anytime. You know where I am. Thanks and stay safe.
LISA-
All right, you too.
MAL-
And we'll see you again soon.
LISA-
All right, man.

Photos on this page - credit - Miri Stebvika